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Fast Facts

The George E. Brown, Jr. Network for Earthquake Engineering Simulation (NEES) is the product of more than a decade of planning by the earthquake engineering community. The NEES network infrastructure encompasses management headquarters; 14 earthquake engineering and tsunami research facility sites located at universities across the United States.

This page give you some quick facts about NEES and NEEScomm. It also provides you brief answers to some of the common questions related to Earthquake Engineering.

Application Screenshot What exactly is the Network for Earthquake Engineering Simulation?

The George E. Brown, Jr. Network for Earthquake Engineering Simulation (NEES) is the product of more than a decade of planning by the earthquake engineering community. The NEES network infrastructure encompasses management headquarters; 14 earthquake engineering and tsunami research facility sites located at universities across the U.S. -- available for testing on-site, in the field, or through telepresence; and cyberinfrastructure operations that connect the work of the experimental facilities, researchers, educators and students. The NEES assets jointly provide the means for collaboration and discovery to improve the seismic design and performance of civil and mechanical infrastructure systems. As of September 2010, the National Science Foundation (NSF), Division of Civil, Mechanical and Manufacturing Innovation (CMMI) has supported 160 NEES research awards through annual research program solicitations.


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Who is George Brown?

The NEES project is named in memory of the late George E. Brown, Jr., former chairman of the House Science committee and a champion of engineering and science in Congress for more than 30 years. Congressman Brown left behind a deep and expansive legacy that has shaped science and science policy in America. In 1977, he authored the legislation creating the interagency National Earthquake Hazards Reduction Program (NEHRP), which in turn, led to the creation of NEES. NEES is authorized by the U.S. Congress under NEHRP and funded by NSF.


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How many labs are there and what kind of testing is done?

The NEES network features 14 geographically-distributed, shared-use laboratories that support several types of experimental work: geotechnical centrifuge research, shake table tests, large-scale structural testing, tsunami wave basin experiments, and field site research. Participating universities include: Cornell University, Lehigh University, Oregon State University, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, University at Buffalo, SUNY,University of California, Berkeley,University of California, Davis,University of California, Los Angeles, University of California, San Diego,University of California, Santa Barbara, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, University of Minnesota, University of Nevada, Reno and University of Texas, Austin.

 


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What is unique about NEES’ cyberinfrastructure?

The NEES website is powered by HUBzero software developed at Purdue University specifically to help the scientific community share resources and collaborate. The environment provides interactive simulation tools, a simulation tool development area, animated presentations, user support, mechanism for uploading and sharing resources and statistics about users and usage patterns. Users can upload their own content—including tutorials, courses, publications, and animations—and share them with the rest of the community. But, each hub is more than just a repository of information. Users do not have to download, compile or install any code; they can launch simulations and post-process results with an ordinary web browser. The tools they access are not just web forms, but powerful graphical tools that support visualization and comparison of results. You can use this software to start a hub for your own scientific community. Visit HUBzero.org to learn more.


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Is your website only for researchers or would members of the general public learn something?

NEES plays a major role in developing next generation earthquake and tsunami engineers, offering education, outreach and training for K-16 students, graduate students, educators, and researchers. The highly successful Research Experience for Undergraduates (REU) Program offers upper division undergraduate students a chance to work with NEES researchers on individual projects that contribute to the goals of an existing NEES research project or to developing cyberinfrastructure tools and/or educational modules. The NEESacademy is an excellent resource for teachers of all student ages to find engaging activities for classroom demonstrations or individual inquiry activities.


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