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NEES Project Warehouse

Seismic Reflection Transect Across the New Madrid Seismic Zone: Imaging Sediment Structure
Curation progress:

Experiment contain sensor measurements and was originally curated in 2009.

Complete - 05/18/2012

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Understanding Long Term Deformation in Mississippi Embayment
Experiment Type: Field
Description: The experiment is meant as a prototype, with the intent that results will be used to develop experience and proposals for larger-scale projects, perhaps with participation and support from the USGS, Earthscope and NEES programs. This is motivated by the need to better understand the spatial and long-term temporal patterns of deformation in the New Madrid seismic zone, so that earthquake recurrence models that underlie hazard assessments may be put on sounder scientific footing. We suggest that this can be done while also addressing the need to better constrain how seismic waves propagate in the thick sediments of the Mississippi embayment, another key aspect of earthquake hazard assessments in the region. The USGS and NEES-UT groups envision this experiment as the beginnings of a major multidisciplinary transect, to shed new lights on one of most enigmatic regions (from an earthquake hazard perspective) of the US. In May 2006, with USGS support, we propose to use the NEES mobile vibrator truck, Thumper, to obtain an approximately 10-km long, high-resolution compressional-wave reflection image of the subsurface geology, including faults and folds, in the 30- to 1000-meter depth range. In part B of Phase I the University of Memphis and USGS will also deploy a piggy-back experiment to employ the Liquidator in studies of sediment nonlinearity in the embayment. This would build on the aforementioned, previous two experiments and would involve extending the field time for the Liquidator.Phase II: Like Phase I, the proposed research also consists of two complementary experiments. The first experiment is a continuation of the prototype study that began in May 2006 (Phase I), with the intent that results will be used to develop experience and proposals for larger-scale projects, perhaps with participation and support from the USGS, Earthscope and NEES programs. In May 2006, the USGS and NEES-UT collected 9 km .of P-wave reflection data. This November (Phase II), with USGS support, we propose to use the NEES mobile vibrator truck, Thumper, to obtain an approximately 10-km long, high-resolution compressional-wave reflection image of the subsurface geology below Crowleys Ridge, Arkansas, including faults and folds, in the 30- to 1000-meter depth range. The second part of the Phase II experiment is a collaboration with the University of Memphis and has the goal to better characterize the seismic velocity structure of the upper ~500 m at two sites within the embayment, using surface-wave analyses. This is a two-day experiment which includes one day of field work at each of two locations where large chemical blasts were detonated near Marked Tree, Arkansas, and Tiptonville, Tennessee, in October 2002 during the Embayment Seismic Excitation Experiment. This experiment will be conducted at the completion of experiment one. This is being supported by the USGS and the University of Memphis, and will also use the NEES mobile vibrator truck, Thumper.
Dates: May 01, 2006 - November 30, 2009
Facility: University of Memphis, TN, United States
University of Texas at Austin, TX, United States
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Trial ( ? ) Repetition ( ? ) Interactive ( ? ) UnprocessedConvertedCorrectedDerived
Documentation:
Related Documents:
Thomas Pratt, Robert Kent, Robert Williams, Jack Odum, William Stephenson (2012). "Origin of the Blytheville Arch, and long-term displacement on the New Madrid seismic zone, central United States", Geological Society of America ( view )
Robert Williams, Robert Kent, Jack Odum, Joan Gomberg, William Stephenson (2007). "POST-EOCENE DEFORMATION OBSERVED IN SEISMIC-REFLECTION PROFILES ACROSS THE SOUTHWESTERN BLYTHEVILLE ARCH AND CROWLEYS RIDGE, ARKANSAS", Seismological Society of America ( view )
Robert Williams, Robert Kent, William Stephenson, Thomas Pratt, Jack Odum (2010). "Recurrent Eocene and Quaternary Uplift Above the Southwestern Blytheville Arch, Arkansas: Is It Contributing to the Formation of Lake St. Francis?", Seismological Society of America ( view )
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